TigerVPN Review

Though it has a lot going for it, TigerVPN just has too many security issues for us to recommend it. That's a shame, because its pricing is reasonable and it will get you into Netflix U.S. Read the details in our full TigerVPN review to see why exactly we recommend you avoid this VPN.

By John Tangney
— Last Updated: 07 May'18
2018-04-12T00:22:29+00:00
Table of Contents Rating
Features
75%
Good
Pricing
75%
Good
Ease of Use
65%
Decent
Supported Devices
75%
Good
Server Locations
80%
Good
Speed
75%
Good
Security and Privacy
50%
Poor
Customer Service
50%
Poor
User Reviews & Comments

Decent
Starts from $ 275 monthly (All Plans)
Visit TigerVPN


TigerVPN is a decent mid-range option in the VPN market if you’re looking for a service to help you watch your favorite TV shows while travelling (though it’s a far cry from from our picks for the best VPN for travelers). It does a reasonably good job of getting past some geoblocking, like Netflix in the United States, though the BBC iPlayer seems to be harder to crack.

However, while testing it we found that TigerVPN suffered from DNS leaks and broadcast your IP for the world to see. On top of that, it’s not that easily configurable by the ordinary user compared to services like ExpressVPN or VyprVPN, which you can read more about in our ExpressVPN review and VyprVPN review. Both are far superior services and cost about the same.

Alternatives for TigerVPN

Starts from$ 666monthly
  • Great for all streaming
  • Highly secure
  • Split tunneling
  • Massive server network
  • 3 simultaneous connections
  • Pricey
Starts from$ 299monthly
  • Well priced
  • Highly secure
  • Thousands of servers
  • Six simultaneous connections
  • Lack of detail on server location
  • No split tunneling
Starts from$ 275monthly
  • Gets into Netflix
  • Updated interface
  • Automatic killswitch
  • Lackluster split tunneling
  • No killswitch controls
  • Spotty ad blocker performance

Strengths & Weaknesses

Pros:

  • Gets into Netflix
  • Decent speeds
  • Free trial
  • Seven-day money back guarantee
  • Decent range of server locations
  • Allows torrenting
  • Can connect on up to 5 devices

Cons:

  • Failed DNS leak test
  • Doesn’t get into BBC iPlayer
  • No killswitch
  • No split tunneling
  • Poorly designed interface

Features

75% - Good

TigerVPN is an interesting variant on the standard suite of features that make up the typical VPN service today. It has a mobile-sized interface like ExpressVPN, but the interface is attached to an icon on the application bar like ZenMate’s, which actually works out being the worst of both worlds as you’ll see in the “ease of use” section below (read our ZenMate review).

Within the interface, you’ll find a list of server locations which is reasonably extensive. You can see them alphabetically by city or country, or else look at a list of your favorites. The list is long enough that it provides a search window in case you don’t want to scan all the way down looking for Sao Paulo.

The interface also contains a settings wheel which will open a second window on your desktop and within this second interface you can connect to your account details. You can also go to the “troubleshooting” screen, which allows you to submit a report, see your VPN connection status, or click the help icon to get to its online technical support page.

Clicking on “submit report” will open a log of your recent connection activity that may be of interest to customers with technical knowledge. Choosing “VPN status” brings you to a list of all servers, with a percentage score indicating their level of functionality. All of them seem to get 100 percent all the time, which would be reassuring if it were an independent assessment.

There’s also a TCP override feature which can be helpful when you’re experiencing frequent disconnections. The default connection type is UDP which can be unstable, but offers better security.

TigerVPN has a fairly unusual feature called “karma points” that gives you credit for liking it on Twitter or Facebook, subscribing to its YouTube channel or rating it at several named VPN reviewing sites, not including Cloudwards.net.

It doesn’t offer a killswitch, which would disconnect your internet if the VPN connection fails. This is a security feature that ensures nobody catches a glimpse of your IP address when your guard is down and vital if you’re looking for the best VPN for torrenting.

TigerVPN claims a killswitch is under consideration, but is not on its agenda currently. The same goes for split tunneling, which is an increasingly common feature of VPN services that allows you to choose which applications on your computer use the service. It’s a handy feature because it can speed your connection up by excluding apps that don’t need VPN protection.

Pricing

75% - Good

Plan1 Month1 Year3 Years
Price Plan
$ 11 99monthly
$ 6 66monthly
$ 2 75monthly
Bandwidth Unlimited GB Unlimited GB Unlimited GB
Included Devices 5 5 5
Bitcoin


TigerVPN behaves like a service that hasn’t quite figured out what it’s trying to do and while this can make the interface less than efficient at times, it also perhaps works in the customer’s favor when you discover that there’s a free trial available that it doesn’t tell you about upfront on the main webpage.

Instead it tells you about a seven-day money back guarantee. However, if you download any of its apps you can opt for a free trial that gives you 500MB of usage before you have to sign up for a plan. This is not quite as good as the TunnelBear free plan which gives you 500MB per month, but you do get access to all the TigerVPN features while it lasts (read our TunnelBear review).

Another point to take note of is that the numbers in the price plan stay the same whether you put a dollar, a euro or a British pound sign in front of them, which can make for a significant difference in the real price you pay for the service. You can pay using credit and debit card as well as PayPal. TigerVPN also accepts bitcoin.

In any case, TigerVPN’s prices are quite competitive if you commit to the three-year plan, though for the same money you could also subscribe to CyberGhost or NordVPN instead. Read our NordVPN review and CyberGhost review to find out why that may be the better way to go.

Ease of Use

65% - Decent

TigerVPN’s client interface resembles those of ZenMate and TunnelBear in being attached to the top of the screen like a dialogue box coming out of the icon in the application bar. However, it’s bigger than the interfaces in these other services while containing the same basic features.

This will suit people who don’t like to squint at small characters on their computer screen or who get annoyed when the client is hidden behind other open windows. However, it has some drawbacks connected to its size in that it doesn’t disappear when you click elsewhere on the screen, so you have to manually dismiss it or it blocks your view.

The advantage of similarly sized interfaces like the ExpressVPN client is that you can position them in the corner of your screen and keep an eye on what your connection status is, but since the Tiger interface can’t be moved around it has the worst of both worlds.  

Like TunnelBear, TigerVPN has a settings wheel on the main interface that opens a separate window on your desktop. It’s mobile sized and unlike the main interface it can be moved around, and left open on your screen, though it doesn’t show any information that you’re likely to want to monitor, such as the connection speed graphic one finds in ExpressVPN.

A slightly off-putting feature of this settings interface is that the items on it are in a faded, low-resolution font, so it looks like they’ve been deactivated even when they’re working just fine. The large size of the window is also hard to understand given the small number of options it contains.

If you click on “system settings”  you can activate the TCP override to get a more stable connection, but more than half of the window is empty and is just sitting there taking up space on your desktop. It’s a badly designed feature.

Another less than optimal feature is that when you go into “account settings” it brings you to a separate screen within the interface that contains two options: “manage accounts” and “karma points.” It would better if “account settings” brought you straight to the online page where you can see both of these options anyway.

Weirdly, this unnecessary extra step in the interface is the most visually attractive part of it. It doesn’t have the faded lettering of the main settings interface but has brightly colored buttons and a cute tiger cartoon.

While we’re complaining about the minor annoyances of this interface it should also be mentioned that if you click on anything within the interface that opens a webpage, it doesn’t open that page within the browser you’re currently using, but chooses your computer’s default browser.

This ends up adding an extra open window instead of just a tab to a screen that may already be crowded enough with TigerVPN’s two client windows. Although each of these things is small in itself, cumulatively such design flaws slow down your workflow if you’re using a service like this for your job.

Supported Devices

75% - Good

TigerVPN supports the main mobile and desktop operating systems: Windows, MacOS, iOS and Android. It can be configured for use on Windows 7 and earlier, on Linux and even on a Raspberry Pi, but these advanced options are for people with technical knowledge.

It can also be installed on some routers if you have technical knowhow, but it’s a task that’s probably not for the fainthearted or the technically illiterate:

You can connect on up to five devices at the same time (though you won’t find it in our listing of the best VPN for multiple devices because, well…), and the mobile app is very similar to the desktop client, down to the strange phenomenon of the faded list items in the settings window.

Server Locations

80% - Good

TigerVPN has a decent number of server locations, including a choice of locations in the U.S., Germany, India and Japan, which puts it a step ahead of some otherwise comparable services like ZenMate or TunnelBear. In all there are 62 locations in 43 countries, not a patch on ExpressVPN but still a lot better than some others.

The geographical spread of these servers is good enough within Europe, Asia and South America, but, as is often the case, it doesn’t have much in Africa or the Middle East. It does quite well in its coverage of other unusual locations, especially in Eastern Europe.

It allows you to organize servers by favorites and alphabetically by either city or country, though it lacks the option of organizing them by region, which is a flaw in a service that has such a distinctive choice of locations within different regions.

Speed

75% - Good

Country:Ping:Download:Upload:
Russia121.121.1
Argentina6622.712.09
Germany1546.569.42
Australia7351.228.32
Hong Kong7762.696.49
U.S.2957.417.5


The connection speed on TigerVPN is very erratic, sometimes excellent and sometimes quite slow, but on balance it was better than several of the competitors like ZenMate or TunnelBear. However, it won’t be winning any prizes in the fastest VPN category, either.

Security and Privacy

50% - Poor

TigerVPN is like a lot of mid-range VPNs in that it doesn’t give you many choices about encryption unless you’re technically-minded and up for configuring the app yourself. It has a special section entitled “geeks” on its dashboard which seems like an attempt to make up for a shortcoming by making it into a feature.

For example, whereas ExpressVPN offers a series of radio buttons by which even ordinary users can opt for L2TP or OpenVPN without needing technical understanding, TigerVPN makes you go into the knowledgebase and read multi-step instructions about how to configure these different protocols on different operating systems.

It doesn’t tell you anything about how it’s protecting you when you’re signed up to a particular server in Seoul or Hong Kong, whether you’re encrypted using the vulnerable PPTP, or the more secure but sometimes slower options of OpenVPN, L2TP or IPSec.

On the landing page of its website it announces this range of encryption protocols as if they were choices you could make within the app, and while this may be technically the case, “technical” is very much the operative word here.

Those criticisms aside, we can say that to its credit TigerVPN did get past the Netflix geoblocking. However, it failed a DNS leak test while doing so:

It also failed to get past the BBC iPlayer geoblocking:

If either of these is particularly important to you, check out our best VPN for Netflix and best VPN for BBC iPlayer articles, instead.

Customer Service

50% - Poor

The TigerVPN knowledgebase makes for a contrast with a service like TunnelBear whose knowledgebase is more focused on explaining how the VPN works than what to do when it doesn’t. TigerVPN seems geared towards troubleshooting known problems that people have had with it in the past, such as having it blocked by your router, or problems with sign up.

If you do have problems while using it, you can go into “settings”, click on “submit report” and this will open a log of your recent connection activity that you can send to its technical support staff. From here you can also go to the helpdesk and contact the support staff.

We found the livechat staff to be responsive from the landing page before we signed up for the service, and to have ready answers to basic questions about pricing. Once we were signed up and using livechat from within the app to ask technical questions, the response was much slower.

First, we got a canned response saying they’d get back to us within 24 hours, or maybe longer if it was the weekend. Then we waited for them to get around to our query, which was a basic question about whether the service offers a killswitch or split tunneling, questions you might expect staff to have ready answers to. It took a couple of days to get a reply.

When you’re inside the app it looks as if you have a choice about whether to contact them by email or to talk on live chat but in fact, both of these buttons lead to the same form, and “livechat” in fact means email.

The Verdict

TigerVPN has some original features like its reward system for users, and its three-year payment plan, but these are not the core reasons why you subscribe to a VPN service and they don’t compensate for its security shortcomings, its erratic speed, and the less than optimal design of its interface.

It’s perhaps a good option if all you want is to get into Netflix and not have to pay a lot of money, but the problems with its security features won’t recommend it to people who need a watertight VPN service.

TigerVPN Review

Serious security issues mar an otherwise okay service.

Though it has a lot going for it, TigerVPN just has too many security issues for us to recommend it. That's a shame, because its pricing is reasonable and it will get you into Netflix U.S. Read the details in our full TigerVPN review to see why exactly we recommend you avoid this VPN.
Starts from$ 275monthly
Visit TigerVPN
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