MediaFire Review

An extremely bare-bones storage solution, MediaFire has little to recommend it except for its low price. That said, if simple storage is all you've ever wanted, then this Mediafire review might be worth a read.

By Branko VlajinWriter
— Last Updated: 27 Nov'18
2018-11-27T17:24:47+00:00
Table of ContentsRating
Features
60%
Fair
Pricing
84%
Very Good
Ease of Use
75%
Good
File Sharing & Syncing
65%
Decent
Speed
70%
Decent
Security
20%
Terrible
Privacy
50%
Poor
Customer Service
60%
Fair
User Reviews & Comments

Fair
Starts from $ 375 per month for 1000 GB
Free plan available Save 25 %
Cloud Storage Reviews

MediaFire dips into the cloud storage market with its pinky, but it can’t quite stand shoulder to shoulder with services in our best cloud storage comparison. It has affordable prices, along with a 10GB free plan that has a fine referral program, but too many drawbacks for us to recommend it for serious use.

The main drawback is the lack of a desktop sync client which is a staple among cloud storage services. Versioning is common, too, but MediaFire doesn’t provide it. Users who need collaboration won’t be pleased, either, because MediaFire doesn’t have native or third-party productivity apps.

If that list of faults doesn’t deter you from giving it a shot, stick with us for this MediaFire review.

Strengths & Weaknesses

Strengths:

  • 10GB free plan
  • Affordable
  • Fast upload speeds
  • Follow collaborative files
  • Decent 20GB file-size limit

Weaknesses:

  • No desktop apps
  • No folder uploading
  • Photo preview only
  • Slow download
  • Weak security & privacy
  • No versioning
  • Deletes data when inactive
  • Free version has ads


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Features

60% - Fair

MediaFire flirts with being a cloud storage service, but it lacks the features of a proper one. The most notable among them is the desktop sync client. It used to have it, but got rid of it, leaving only the web and mobile client. You can only use them to upload and access files.

For capable services that feature desktop clients for Windows and Linux, read our best cloud storage of Windows and best cloud storage for Linux articles. Most picks in either guide support macOS, too.

That said, if the lack of desktop support isn’t a deal breaker for you, MediaFire offers plenty of space at competitive rates. Anybody who needs to free space on their computer by storing files long-term could benefit from its affordable pricing. Plus, the web app has fast upload speeds.

The mobile app lets you automatically backup photos and videos. That will benefit users who take a lot of pictures. Its shortcomings prevent it from making our best online storage for photos guide, though. The web app lets you preview photos, but not file types that we’ve become accustomed to previewing while using other services.

Users will find that many features other storage solutions offers are missing in MediaFire, including file versioning. The only option to recover files with it is to pull them out of the trash after you’ve deleted them.

You might also run into problems if you need to upload large files. Though the 20GB file-size limit matches Microsoft OneDrive, it can’t compete with Sync.com, which tops our best cloud storage for large files comparison. Sync.com doesn’t place a limit on file size, so read our Sync.com review if that’s of interest to you.

MediaFire’s web app has a search bar that helps you find the files you need. You can type the file name and select file types you want to filter.

MediaFire isn’t good for collaboration because it doesn’t offer an office suite like OneDrive and Google Drive do and it doesn’t have any application integrations with third-party services.

Mediafire Features Overview

Starts from$ 375per month for 1000 GB

Sync

Sync Folder
Block-Level Sync
Selective Sync
Bandwidth management
Sync Any Folder

File Sharing

File Link Sharing
Link Passwords
Link Expiry Dates
Folder Sharing
Folder Permissions
Link Download Limits
Upload Links

Productivity

File Previews
Edit Files
In-App Collaboration
Office Online
Google Docs
Notes App
Media Playback
Mobile Apps
Deleted File Retention
Versioning
WebDAV

Security

At-Rest Encryption
In-Transit Encryption
Encryption Protocol
n/a
Zero Knowledge
Two-Factor Authentication
Server Location
US

Support

24/7 Support
Live Chat Support
Telephone Support
Email Support
User Forum
Knowledgebase

Misc

Free Plan

Pricing

84% - Very Good

MediaFire has a 10GB free plan, which is much better than, say, OneDrive, which provides half the storage space. That didn’t help MediaFire make our best free cloud storage list, though. One reason for that is because it’ll remove your data if you don’t access your free account for a year.

Free
  • Can be increased to up to 49GB with referrals.
  • 10 GB Storage
Pro
  • 1000 GB Storage
1-year plan $ 3.75/ month
$45.00 billed every year
Save 25 %
Business
  • Storage up to 100TB. Includes 100 user accounts.
  • 1000 GB Storage
1-year plan $ 40.00/ month
$480.00 billed every year
Save 20 %

Premium plans are currently discounted 50 percent. Subscribing to them removes the annoying ads that are present on a free account. The premium plans also include priority support, advanced link sharing features and password protection for files. They raise the file-size limit to 20GB, too.

Even if you’re on a premium account, you’ll see ads on the download page if you use more than the monthly bandwidth limit for downloads.

The Pro plan is $5 per month or equivalent to $3.75 a month if you pay for the year, which is a great deal. In fact, it rivals some of the services on our best deals in cloud storage list. If you want twice the storage space for $96 per year, you should try pCloud. Read more about it in our pCloud review.

The Business plan is fit for small business users who don’t need to collaborate much, but do need to store their files. It provides 1TB of storage by default but you can have up to 100TB. It also grants up to 100 users accounts. The plan adds customizable branding and access to a detailed security log, too.

If you need a lot of storage space and strong collaboration and productivity features, we suggest you consult our best enterprise file sync and share article for more services that provide them.

Ease of Use

75% - Good

Because there’s no desktop app, you’re going to interact with MediaFire using the web and mobile apps. The web app is modern and user-friendly, and it has a nice layout. You can navigate your files, along with the trash for deleted files, using the tree structure that’s always visible on the left.

You can preview your files in grid or list views.

To upload files, you can use the drag-and-drop functionality, which enables you to drop files anywhere on the page. You can do the same with folders, too.

The default page you see when you enter the web app is “files,” but you can see your activity on the “recent” page and files that you follow on the “follow” page.

To modify individual files or folders you can click the little arrow sign associated with them, right-click them and select an action from the menu or select one or more and perform an action from the top menu.

The mobile app is also straightforward to use, but its design is a step behind other solutions. Its upload button isn’t as prominent and the menu button isn’t the modern “burger” button that lets you quickly access the most relevant options. That said, it won’t give you issues. It works on Android and iOS.

File Sharing & Syncing

65% - Decent

MediaFire doesn’t do well at syncing. Syncing between mobile devices happens quite smoothly, but without the ability to sync to desktops, you’re going to spend a lot of time uploading and downloading rather than just placing your files in a sync folder and forgetting about them.

That’s how most providers in our cloud storage reviews do it, so it’s surprising to see that MediaFire doesn’t. It can’t even be considered an oversight because MediaFire offered a desktop app at one time, but phased it out, which limits the service’s potential.

File sharing works like it’s supposed to, though, and it’s straightforward to use. Send someone a link and they can use it to download the file. You can share your link directly to Facebook, Twitter and other social media. Without a subscription, links you share will be ad-supported, so be aware that it’s not a clean look.

If you buy one of the premium plans, you can create one-time links that let you decide when they expire. You can also make your folders a FileDrop, so others can upload directly to them.

If you do need to secure a previously shared file, you can turn the link off, closing the file to anyone who is not following it.

Sharing folders works like link sharing, which means you can’t invite others to a folder and give them permissions.

Those sharing features are decent, but expiry dates for all links and the ability to password protect them, along with folder sharing, would be more useful. You can find services that have more powerful sharing and content control options in our best cloud storage for sharing article.

MediaFire also lets people follow files. That capability cleans up collaborations so you don’t need to send links back and forth when working with someone long-term.

Speed

70% - Decent

MediaFire surprised us in our first upload attempt, achieving speeds we thought weren’t possible. The second attempt was more in line with other services and theory. The upload speed averaged 22 minutes and seven seconds for a 1GB zipped folder, which is quite fast.

We did our tests using an Ethernet connection in Belgrade, Serbia, with an upload speed of 6 megabits per second and a download speed of 100 Mbps.

The download time was about six times slower than other services we’ve tested, with an average speed of 12 minutes and 47 seconds. In theory, it should’ve taken around a minute and a half.

 First attemptSecond attemptAverage
Upload time:00:18:0000:26:1500:22:07
Download time:00:11:3400:14:0100:12:47

MediaFire doesn’t use a block-level sync algorithm, which would speed up the transfer of files that have already been uploaded by transferring only the changed portions. That’s to be expected, though, considering there’s no desktop app to sync files.

Security

20% - Terrible

The online world can be a scary place because of threats from hackers and other malicious people. That means good security is a must for cloud storage services. We look for security features that fit that description.

Cloud security relies on protocols and encryptions to protect your files in transit and at rest. They include the TLS protocol to stop man-in-the-middle attacks, at-rest and in-transit encryptions to scramble your files and private encryption to ensure your privacy.

Two-factor authentication will stop hackers who’ve stolen your password from accessing your account. Even if a provider has it, though, you should make a strong password.

That said, MediaFire isn’t forthcoming with information about its security features so we have to assume it doesn’t use any of those. As such, it bumps shoulder with Yandex Disk and Amazon Drive. We rank Amazon Drive higher than MediaFire, though. See why in our Amazon Drive review.

If you want strong security, we advise you to read our most secure cloud storage article.

MediaFire isn’t zero-knowledge, either, so your data could be vulnerable to hacks or other unwanted access. That isn’t something to ignore, so you shouldn’t store anything sensitive on it.

We encourage you to take a look at our roundup of the best zero-knowledge cloud services to avoid the problem.

Privacy

50% - Poor

MediaFire doesn’t misuse your personal information, which it receives from your interactions while using the service. That’s how other services operate, too, but MediaFire says you “give [it] information yourself voluntarily, when you interact with [its] ads.” That includes when you watch videos. It uses the information to “show content that’s relevant and interesting.”

It can collect personal information, such as names and email addresses, that you add to shared folders and files, too.

The fact that the privacy policy is in a text box with a small font that makes it difficult to read doesn’t win it points, either. We like the approach Tresorit takes. Its privacy policy is clear, easy to read and even has a summary text for those who don’t like to read legalese. Read more about that service in our Tresorit review.

MediaFire promises not to sell your personal information to advertisers. It’ll cooperate with third parties if required by law, though.

The service claims to comply with the General Data Protection Regulation, too, but we haven’t seen any rights associated with the GDPR in its privacy policy. Plus, the compliance page hasn’t been updated since before the GDPR came into effect. You can learn more about the GDPR in our GDPR guide.

Customer Service

60% - Fair

If you have an issue, you can consult the knowledgebase or contact support. MediaFire’s knowledgebase can be helpful for basic tasks. It’s split into categories, which helps you find the answer easily.

The articles are written well and have helpful screenshots to guide you. For more complicated tasks, you’d be lucky to find related articles and MediaFire doesn’t offer user forums for you to get help from more experienced members. Live chat and phone support are also unavailable.

If you don’t find an answer you can contact technical support directly. We did so but haven’t received an answer in more than a day.

The Verdict

MediaFire has a lot of misses. It doesn’t have versioning or desktop sync. Its sharing and content control options are limited. There are no third-party or native productivity apps, either. We also have to assume that it doesn’t have security options because it doesn’t provide information about them.

If that’s too much for you, consult our best cloud storage guide for help choosing the right service for you.

It lacks a lot, but it doesn’t charge an arm and a leg. Its upload speed is fast, too. You can use the free plan’s 10GB of storage to test the service and you can increase it to a respectable 49GB.

What do you think about MediaFire? Are there too many downsides for you or are you willing to give it a try thanks its decent prices? Let us know what you think in the comments below. Thank you for reading.

Starts from$ 375per month for 1000 GB

Sync

Sync Folder
Block-Level Sync
Selective Sync
Bandwidth management
Sync Any Folder

File Sharing

File Link Sharing
Link Passwords
Link Expiry Dates
Folder Sharing
Folder Permissions
Link Download Limits
Upload Links

Productivity

File Previews
Edit Files
In-App Collaboration
Office Online
Google Docs
Notes App
Media Playback
Mobile Apps
Deleted File Retention
Versioning
WebDAV

Security

At-Rest Encryption
In-Transit Encryption
Encryption Protocol
n/a
Zero Knowledge
Two-Factor Authentication
Server Location
US

Support

24/7 Support
Live Chat Support
Telephone Support
Email Support
User Forum
Knowledgebase

Misc

Free Plan

MediaFire Review

Cheap, but lacks features

An extremely bare-bones storage solution, MediaFire has little to recommend it except for its low price. That said, if simple storage is all you've ever wanted, then this Mediafire review might be worth a read.
Starts from$ 375per month for 1000 GB
Visit MediaFire

14 thoughts on “MediaFire”

  1. HOW DO I CAN CHANGE THE FOLDER SYNC ?????????!!!!!
    It is automatically situated in disk C with only 42 Gb
    That is not enought !!
    I want to chance the sync folder to disc D where i have 200 Gb .
    I will not be able to work only with these 42 Gb 🙁 ;(
    what can i do, please help !

  2. There is no option on the software to change the location. But there is a work around.
    – First exit MediaFire Desktop.
    – Then You have to use Windows registry ‘regedit’ and browse to the following key :
    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\MediaFire\Desktop
    Than update the value of Cloud_Home_Folder_express2
    Put you desired path. It’s better if the path ends qwith MediaFire folder. e.g D:\abc\MediaFire
    Restart MediaFire Desktop and it should start syncing to the new folder

  3. Hi, I don’t know if what I want to do is possible…
    The site said that I would have got a “direct link” to the file if I had bought the pro account… so I bought it… now I would like to stream my files on a site I’m trying to do without “passing” through the site of mediafire… is it possible or not? thank you very much

  4. Mediafire could be good but the upload and download rates make it basically unusable. I tried using them for 6 months, but gave up due to the slow data rates. I guess they have some severe bandwidth restrictions. For comparison, a folder with 4GB of data took over 24 hours to upload to MediaFire. On Google Drive, it took around 20 minutes. Software and support are good but without a reasonable data rate, it isn’t usable.

  5. I’m using mediafire for 2 months and it can still surprise me with new quirks to its working.
    The basic thing i went for this service (my first cloud based backup storage) was the price. For 25$ a year it seemed quite reasonable.

    The windows client is really simple – install, pick a folder and let the app to do all the necessary things.

    I’ve encountered several problems with 1) the client, 2) with the web interface, 3) the security:

    1a) THE WORST THING – FILE TIMESTAMP CHANGE !!!! (WTF!!!!) – This one really got me. I mean, i personally want to go away from this service and woun’t recommend it at all for this one. I noticed that after a “30 days no ask money back period” 🙁 The client is changing almost all file changed timestamps (the date when the file was changed for last time) to a date and time, when the file was uplouded to the service. WTF? It did on almost all of my files, but not all, the key to what files get this behaviour and which not is completelly unknown to me.
    I restored my files from backup from before i went online, it seemed ok for one week or so, the client DIDN’T detect any change, but then again. The client app suddenly showed (by number of files to sync) that all those restored files need to be synced, and only change it did to them was to change the file timestamp (probably “restored” from cloud). I mean seriously, i expected, that there will be NO CHANGE TO MY FILES AT ALL, but this?
    But, if file timestamp is not an issue for you, than you might consider this as a no problem. The sync also meant all the problems described bellow to reappear again.

    1b) the client is baddly written app – i noticed, that my hdd was doing some strange noises during intital uploud, so i monitored it with SysInternals ProcMon. What i found? That the app is reading my files in this way: It opens file at some current location, reads 12k (12288B) in one read, then performs another 4k read and then closes the file. And again, and again and again. So instead of one long read, it does zillions of reads, with many reads needing a disk to seek. I was uplouding a large collection of files (70k+) so the noise from hdd lasted for several days. I dig into that a bit deeper, but only found a hint, that this constant 12288 bytes is from old microsoft windows phone 7.x development framework.

    1c) SQL Lite based database – this one is minus and plus (see my point 1d) ), the client uses for its internal workings SQL Lite database, which can be accessed in its pure form via any db tool. So you can see its database structure and data. The minus is that every change on client is done via separate journal file. On my SSD drive it means, that editing record for every file means creating journal file, writing necessary data into it, than commit the data into main database = at least 2 writes for every change. For my initial uploud it meant over 140k+ writes on SSD so my wearout factor of SSD went a little bit down. Just from this factor. On windows 10 you can clearly see this in your windows task manager, resp. in Resource monitoring, where you can see lots of desktop.db-journal files beeing created, written once and then closed. Well not a good thing for SSD, but might not be inevitable with this technology (Perhaps journaling into memory? idk)

    1d) During my initial uploud, the client itself get stuck in indefinite loop. I don’t know how that happened, but i suspect that the problem was caused by app update during that time. The manifestation of the loop was simple: client showed 25k files to sync, then the number get lower a bit and then returned again to that same number. It went for days before i noticed, but 200GB were uplouded by that time and the counter was still the same. I contacted the support, they gave me an advice to fully reset the client. That didn’t help. The number went a bit down, but later the client was stucked again. So i went debugging their database and after some time i found about 30 files, that were already uplouded but the client tried to uploud them again and the service returned an error. I moved those files away, the client downloaded the data from cloud and everything was good.

    2a) Web interface – The next thing which I want to mention at least briefly, is service web interface, which is really, really slow. I mean slow. Unbearably slow. Seriously, if you want to work with your files through web interface, than look for another service. The web interface is based probably on ajax calls, so you load the page, you see basic interface and then you wait for ajax calls to load the data from servers. I waited between 10 to 90 seconds for it to load the basic directory structure with 3 directories. I clicked on folder and waited again 10 to 90 seconds to load the contents of one of those directories. It depends probably on server load, how quickly it can process the requests, but sometimes, i just lost patience and closed the web after couple of minutes of waiting. But usually you get on average 15 seconds response time for any operation. For me, this is really slow.

    3) You dont know anything about security of this service. Mediafire is quite reluctant to put any information about security on their website. And it is your data they have, so more details about client/transfer/server side security measures would be acceptable. I consider this as a standard in security transparency by any of cloud storage service today.

    My final thoughts. If you are here for cheap solution and have large pile of data, this service can save you couple of bucks. My conclusion is, that it is better to pay the double for average service in cloud market nowadays and get more decent service than Mediafire.

  6. I’m a Mediafire PRO user (1TB disk space). Three days ago one of my files, showed into the web portal, was not accessible and not downloadable.
    I’ve opened a ticket with customers support and they say that the server holding my file was in “restore phase”.
    Today, after three days, the file is not yet accessible.
    Very very poor service.

  7. MediaFire recently announced (via a popup on the Windows desktop and a blog post) that they are closing down support for their current desktop sync, and working on a new desktop sync app:

    http://blog.mediafire.com/2016/05/on-to-new-things/

    What’s not clear is whether there will be a gap between the closure of the current desktop app (30 July 2016) and the release of the new desktop app. I guess we’ll see…

  8. Hello! I have a small question. I have downloaded the iOS version and I could not upload files from other apps. For example I want to upload a pdf book from Documents (by Readdle) this is impossible because Mediafire is not listed in the sharr menu. Is there any way that allows me to upload file from other apps to Mediafire? Thank you in advance!

  9. Users beware! I uploaded a sensitive file to MediaFire believing that it’s a secure website. The file was hacked in transit and posted on a hacker’s website. It was identified by the cyber security authorities in my country, who alerted me within 24 hours (a BIG thanks to them). For safety sake I immediately deleted the file from the MediaFire website and contacted them about it. Took them 72 hours (!) to respond with an ineffectual response. What I gathered was that uploaded files are NOT encrypted on the client PC before being transmitted to Mediafire’s servers. So much for Mediafire’s “security”. Do yourself a big favor and give Mediafire a miss.

  10. This is my reply from Mediafire, as a business user enquiring about security: Uploads are done over secure HTTPS. Files are not encrypted on our servers but we do have industry-standard security around the access to our servers and infrastructure. To access user data, a 3rd party would require the 15-character alpha-numeric “key” value for a file and the sharing URL (share link) for that file would have to be enabled from within your account. Files with a share link enabled can still be downloaded over insecure HTTP or over secure HTTPS – that choice is up to the downloader.

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MediaFire Review

Cheap, but lacks features

An extremely bare-bones storage solution, MediaFire has little to recommend it except for its low price. That said, if simple storage is all you've ever wanted, then this Mediafire review might be worth a read.
Starts from$ 375per month for 1000 GB
Visit MediaFire
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